Glossary

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Allowed Claims

Claims where entitlement to benefits has been authorized.

Average Days Lost

The average number of days lost for which wage loss benefits were paid for claims within 1 month, 3 months or 6 months after the injury/illness occurred.

Average Loss of Earnings (LOE) per Full Paid Day

Average amount paid for an entire day off work, adjusted for inflation.

Benefit Costs

Benefit Costs represent the total life to date costs associated with the claim. These costs include Loss of Earnings (including LOE covered by advances), Health Care, Labour Market Re-entry (LMR)/Work Re-Integration (WR), Non Economic Loss (NEL), Future Economic Loss (FEL), Worker pensions (including the capitalized values), burial expenses, bereavement counselling, dependent’s lump sum and dependent’s pension (including the capitalized values). Excluded are Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care costs.

Benefit Payments

Payments made to or on behalf of injured and ill workers. Includes Loss of Earnings (LOE), Workers' Pension, Health Care, Future Economic Loss (FEL), Survivor Benefits, External Providers and Non-Economic Loss (NEL). Excludes benefit liabilities and claims administration costs.

Benefit Payment Year

The year in which benefit payments were made.

Claim Rate

The number of lost time claims per 10,000 employed workers: (Number of Schedule 1 and 2 Allowed Lost Time Claims/Statistics Canada Employed Worker Census Count) x 10,000

Claims for Acute Exposures and Effects

Claims for acute exposures and effects describe medical conditions that arise immediately after exposure to a chemical, biological or physical agent in the workplace.

Claims for Chronic Exposures and Effects

Claims for Chronic Exposures and Effects involve medical conditions that develop gradually over time from prolonged or chronic exposures in the workplace.

Data Maturity

Data continues to be revised after the year has concluded as additional claims are reported and decisions on complex claims are made. The revision of data after the year has concluded is called "maturing". All data contained in this report is matured three months, with the exception of benefit payments which represents cash paid during the year to or on behalf of injured workers and are not matured three months following year end.

District

Statistics Canada 2011 Census Divisions for the province of Ontario

Employer

An employer means every person having in his, her or its service under a contract of service or apprenticeship another person engaged in work in or about an industry and includes:

  • A trustee, receiver, liquidator, executor or administrator who carries on an industry,
  • A person who authorizes or permits a learner to be in or about an industry for the purpose of undergoing training or probationary work, or
  • A deemed employer

Coverage under the WSIA only applies to those employers: 

  • whose operations are compulsorily covered by Schedules 1 or 2 of the Act, or
  • whose operations have been added to Schedule 1 of the Act by application, or 
  • who have optional insurance only
External Provider Payments for Work Reintegration Program

These are payments associated with the reintegration program and represent payments to external agencies providing rehabilitation services, such as training programs to assist an injured worker's return to work and the costs of work transition assessments and plans, in the case of injured workers not returning to work with their pre-injury employer.

First Return to Work Specialist Referrals Within 12 Weeks

Cases with a first referral received by the Return to Work program within 12 weeks of either the case's date of injury or latest recurrence date.

Future Economic Loss Benefit Payment

Compensation to a worker, who was injured after January 1, 1990 and prior to January 1, 1998 and suffers a workplace injury resulting in a permanent impairment or temporary disability for 12 continuous months.

Health Care Payment

Payments made on behalf of an injured or ill worker for professional services provided by health care practitioners, hospitals and health facilities as well as the cost of drugs, attendant services, home or vehicle modifications, assistive devices and prostheses, extraordinary transportation costs to obtain health care and other measures to facilitate independent living and to improve the quality of an injured or ill worker's life.

High Impact Claims

High impact claims are allowed LTIs and fatalities that involve the lower back, shoulder or result from fractures which represent the three types of LTIs and fatalities with the highest life-time costs and average duration.

Industry Sector

The WSIB's operations are organized into 17 industry sectors (Schedule 2 is a separate industry sector).

Injury

A worker who sustains a personal injury by accident arising out of and in the course of his or her employment is entitled to benefits under the insurance plan.

Injury / Illness Year

Year of injury or illness is the year in which the injuries and illnesses occurred.

Injury Event

Describes the manner in which the injury/disease was produced/inflicted and is based on the National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP) coding standard (NWIS). This standard is based on the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Z795-96 codes which allow for more detailed coding injury details.

Injury Source

The object, substance, exposure or bodily motion that directly produced or inflicted the injury/disease identified under Nature of Injury and is based on the National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP) coding standard (NWIS). This standard is based on the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Z795-96 codes which allow for more detailed coding injury details.

Labour Market Re-entry (LMR) Program

The Labour Market Re-entry (LMR) Program was introduced January 1, 1998 as part of Bill 99. LMR services were outsourced to primary service providers who provided assessments, LMR planning, and case management services. These primary service providers used a variety of secondary service providers (public, not for profit, and private) to deliver education and training programs. The WSIB established a new integrated return to work and LMR program in November 2010 called the Work Reintegration program.

Locked-In Claim

Those claims, with an injury/illness date on or after January 1, 1998 (Bill 99), where a final review of the loss of earnings benefit at 72 months post injury/illness has been completed and the benefit will continue to be paid to age 65, with few exceptions.

Long Latency Claims

Long latency claims can involve a delay of many years between the period of exposure to a disease-causing agent and the appearance of disease symptoms.

Loss Of Earning Benefit (LOE)

Wage loss benefits for time lost from work due to a work-related injury or illness occurring on or after January 1, 1998.

Lost Time Claim

A lost time claim is created when a worker suffers a work-related injury/disease which results in: 
•being off work past the day of accident
•loss of wages/earnings, or
•a permanent disability/impairment.

Lost Time Injury (LTI) Rate

Number of allowed lost-time injuries/illnesses per 100 derived full-time equivalent (FTE) workers for the injury year specified, where 100 FTE = 200,000 derived hours.  [(Lost-time injuries/illnesses)/Derived hours]*200,000

Nature of Injury

The nature of injury or disease describes the principal physical characteristics(s) of the injury or disease.
The principal physical characteristics of an injury/disease and based on the National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP) coding standard (NWIS). This standard is based on the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Z795-96 Coding of Work Injury or Disease Information coding standard which allow for more detailed coding injury details.

No Lost Time Claim

A no lost time claim results from a work-related injury where no time is lost from work, other than on the day of accident, but where health care is required. The health care costs resulting from the injury are paid by the WSIB.

No Lost-time Injury (NLTI) Rate

Number of allowed no lost-time injuries/illnesses per 100 derived full-time equivalent (FTE) workers for the injury year specified, where 100 FTE = 200,000 derived hours.  [(No lost-time injuries/illnesses)/Derived hours]*200,000

Non Locked-In Claim

Those claims, with an injury/illness date on or after January 1, 1998 (Bill 99), receiving loss of earnings benefits that may not be reviewed at the 72 month post injury/illness date.

Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)

NIHL is a permanent loss of hearing usually in both ears resulting from inner ear damage due to prolonged, continuous or intermittent hazardous noise exposure.

Non-Economic Loss Benefits (NEL)

Compensation paid to a worker who suffers a permanent impairment as a result of an injury or illness that occurred after January 1, 1990 and is based on 2 factors the severity of the permanent impairment and the age of the worker. All injury/illness types (lost-time and no lost-time) are included in this measure.  Non-Economic Loss cannot be assessed until a worker has reached maximum medical recovery (MMR). As such NEL awards are typically awarded within 3 years of incident.

Occupation

A major grouping of occupations that are coded based on National Occupational Classification standards.

Occupational Disease Fatalities by Entitlement year

Allowed claims from workers who died of a work-related disease or condition for which entitlement to survivor benefits has been granted in the year specified. 
Excludes claims from workers who passed away while in receipt of 100% permanent disability (PD) benefits granted under a pre-1990 legislative framework.

Occupational Diseases

Occupational diseases are caused by exposure to physical, chemical, or biological agents in the workplace.

Other Benefit

Payments made to or on behalf of injured and ill workers. Includes situational payments such as Temporary Total and Temporary Partial for Bill 162 claims (accident dates between January 2, 1990 and December 31,1997) and pre-1990 claims.

Part of Body

The injured/disease part of body affected by an injury/disease and is directly linked to the nature of injury/disease which is based on the National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP) coding standard (NWIS). This standard is based on the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Z795-96 codes which allow for more detailed coding injury details.

Percentage of Workforce Covered

Percentage of the employed labour force that is covered under the WSIA.

Percentage Receiving Loss of Earnings Benefits

The percentage of injured or ill workers that continue to receive full or partial Loss of Earnings (LOE) benefits on the specified anniversary.

Permanent Impairment

Any permanent physical or functional abnormality or loss (including disfigurement) which results from an injury, and any psychological damage arising from the abnormality or loss. A worker's degree of permanent impairment is expressed as a percentage of total permanent impairment of the whole person.

Registered Claims

Registered claims for injuries, illnesses or fatalities reported to the WSIB in the year (as some claims are registered with the WSIB after the year in which the injury, illness or fatality occurred) and includes all allowed, denied, abandoned and pending claims.

Registration Year

Total number of claims registered with the WSIB by year. Some claims are registered with the WSIB after the year in which the injury, illness or fatality occurred.

Return to Work Program (Work Reintegration Program)

The Work Reintegration program is a comprehensive and integrated approach to returning injured workers to employment. Early and ongoing support is provided to the workplace parties to create work reintegration plans. The focus is on return to the injury employer, and where that isn't possible, to provide high quality training and placement services that enable the worker to find a job with a new employer. The Work Reintegration program, launched in November 2010, integrates Return to Work and Work Transition programs.

Return to Work Specialist (RTWS)

Provide expert advice, vocational rehabilitation planning, and support workers and employers to coordinate work reintegration which may include accommodation and transition to a different job if necessary.

Statistics Canada - Labour Force Employment

Statistics Canada. Table 282-0008 - Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), sex and age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted). (accessed: April 29, 2013)

Survivor Benefit Payment

Benefits payments provided to a spouse, dependent children and other dependents when an injured worker suffers a fatality in the workplace or as a result of an occupational disease. Benefits include lump sum payments, monthly payments, bereavement counselling and burial expenses.

Traumatic Fatalities by Year of Death

Allowed claims from workers who died of a work-related traumatic incident in the year specified.
Excludes claims from workers who passed away while in receipt of 100% permanent disability (PD) benefits granted under a pre-1990 legislative framework.

Work Transition (WT) Program

The Work Transition program replaced the outsourced Labour Market Re-entry (LMR) Program. Unlike the LMR program, Work Transition focuses first on helping the injured workers and employers find suitable and available work with the injury employer. The Work Transition Program provides new options to help workers remain with their employer including re-training and the alternative of part time employment in appropriate cases. When it is not possible for a worker to return to work with the injury employer, the Work Transition Program offers a broad range of services including high quality assessment, training and placement services to support workers to find a job with a new employer.

Work Transition Administrative Costs

Total administrative costs of the Work Transition Program.

Work Transition Plans Completed Resulting in Return to Work

Work Transition plans where the injured worker is employed at the conclusion of the plan. This measure excludes cases with prior Labour Market Re-entry plan services.

Work Transition Specialist (WTS)

Provide expert advice, vocational rehabilitation planning, and support workers and employers to co-ordinate work reintegration which may include accommodation and transition to a different job if necessary.

Work Transition/Labour Market Re-entry Plans Completed

Work Transition/Labour Market Re-entry plans where the injured worker is employed or employable at the conclusion of the plan.

Work Transition/Labour Market Re-entry Plans Completed Resulting in Return to Work

Work Transition plans where the injured worker is employed at the conclusion of the plan.

Work Transition/Labour Market Re-entry Program Costs

Totals costs by service category (Assessment Evaluations, Education/Training, Placement & Retention, Provider Related, Supplies & Equipment, Travel Related, and Other) for the Work Transition/Labour Market Re-entry programs.

Worker's Pension Benefit Payment

Pensions for injured workers suffering a workplace injury prior to January 1, 1990 based on the degree of the injured worker's permanent disability.

WSIB Covered Employment Schedule 1

The number of full time equivalent workers is an estimate based on employer reported insurable earnings divided by the average hourly wage for the rate group divided by 2,000 hours. It is assumed a person works 2,000 hours per year.

WSIB Covered Employment Schedule 2

The number of full time equivalent workers is an estimate based on data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH).

WSIB Schedule 1

Schedule 1 employers are those for which the WSIB is liable to pay benefit compensation for workers' claims. Under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, Schedule 1 employers are required to pay premiums to the WSIB and are protected by a system of collective liability. Under this Act, the WSIB pays benefits to injured workers out of money pooled in the insurance fund it administered, and Schedule 1 employers are relieved of individual responsibility for actual accident costs.

WSIB Schedule 2

Schedule 2 employers are employers that self-insure the provisions of benefits under the WSIA. Schedule 2 employers are liable to pay all benefit compensation and administration costs for the workers' claims. The WSIB administers the payment of the benefits for workers of Schedule 2 employers and recovers the cost of these benefits plus administration fees from the employers.